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We practice sustainability at the farm. Crop rotation, use of drip irrigation and re-using the flower water each week are some of the ways we are being kind to the earth.
As of March 11th we are sold out for our coming season of harvest boxes. If you are interested in joining us for 18 weeks of our beautiful flower share, please email Lorrie at shadymaplefarmcsa@gmail.com. We have 3 flower shares for the season available.

Our harvest boxes are on Tuesdays with pickup between 4:00 - 6:00 pm at the Farm. 8005 Portland Rd. N.E. Salem, Oregon.


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Week 16


Brooks prunes. These are such a delight. The trees are loaded this year, not so every year. We are feeling lucky!

Our earliest Asian pears.

A slightly tougher skinned Asian pear. Ripens a little later. So very crunchy.

Slicing cucumbers from the field.

Two varieties of yellow crookneck squash. One is bumpy, one is smooth. These are from our second planting of summer squash.

Very young and tender skinned summer squash. The zucchini are showing dust from our neighbor's field work.

Grams and Other Mary have a little helper this morning.

Anna and Scott "clean" the kohlrabi. They are taking off the extra leaves while their pup looks on.

My great niece who lives at the farm just returned from her first day of kindergarten. Looking pretty spiffy!

Loving her new backpack. Sweet girl :)


A large collection of grapes.



Bagged grapes. We try to package them so they don't squish each other in their sacks in the harvest boxes.

Red noodle beans. These are pretty strange looking. They do hold their color when cooked.

Green beans waiting to be bagged.

Red jalapenos. 

Hungarian wax peppers. These are hot to me.

A smaller slicing cucumber with a few lemon cucumbers.

Tasty yellow and red mini bells along side green bells.

One of our favorites here at the farm. Fried yellow crookneck squash. Slice, toss in flour and garlic salt and fry in olive oil or butter. The best.

Zucchini "noodles" are tossed in olive oil and lightly sauteed. 

Today's vegetable salad. So tasty. 

Pickled red onions in vinegar and oil. Crunchy and tasty.

Pumpkin cookies with wonderful pumpkin frosting. 

What a treat. Lunch is always a variety of fresh vegetables in new and delicious ways. 

Lisa on the left, Anna on the right. Eating  lunch with the cherry tomatoes.

Bill, Faith and Mary (just joining us at the farm after her back surgery a few weeks ago, notice her brace) enjoying their lunches.

Anna made just a few cookies for us. Mmmm.

Orange and yellow carrots. They are very crisp. I particularly think the yellow ones are sweet.

Today's tomato collection awaits bagging.

Parsley is bright green and vibrant today.
It smells really good, too.

Blue salvia in the front, blue and white spires of veronica toward the back. A few light blue and white pincushion flowers, too.

Another view, Lisa and I love blue flowers. There aren't as many choices when trying to grow blue flowers. The only flower color harder to find is black. A black flower? Hmm.

A wide variety of carnations we grew from seed this past winter are starting to bloom. Usually perennials don't bloom until their second year. We are getting a fragrant bonus.

Purple dahlias and snapdragons with fountain grass.

Teddy Bear sunflowers with heavenly blue statice.

Different colored zinnias, pink asters and the very first Sweet William. We grew them from seed this past winter and they, too, are blooming early.

The last few blue delphinium with the different types of orange zinnias.

Blue statice with light yellow sunflowers.

Snapdragons give these orange zinnias a different look.

The table where Lisa is working. Many works in progress. 

Arching blue veronica with light colored zinnias and heavenly blue statice.

If you could only smell this cart full of flowers. Clove scented carnations are so sweet.

A few King apples off the big tree near the greenhouses.

Mary in the background and Faith nearby marvel at the size of these apples.

This is all for Week 16.
See you next week, Lorrie